11 Comments

  1. deion
    March 6, 2012

    I’m sure that many foreign people are interested to visit this very wonderful place. This structure had marked also on the place history.

  2. Feng Shui Inc
    March 8, 2012

    Thank you for giving such a vivid account of the way up to Tiger’s Nest Monastry. Its very untoched and non-commercialised condition certainly will leave many opportunities for feng shui explorations and study trips. Well done.

  3. Susie Rodriguez
    March 8, 2012

    I’m not an expert when it comes to this. Didn’t even know this was possible. Useful read, appreciate your posting this.

  4. The Wanderer
    March 17, 2012

    I went to climb up the Tiger’s Nest Monastery a few years back. Decided to walk all the way up — took me over an hour. it wasn’t an easy climb at all, but seeing the view up there, it’s well worth it!

    • Zhiqiang & Tingyi
      August 25, 2012

      totally agree – the breathtaking sight of the Tiger’s Nest and the surrounding tranquility is definitely worth the climb!

  5. Suzie
    September 10, 2012

    I LOVED your narrative and photos of the trek up to Tiger’s Nest Monastery. I am going to Myanmar and then Bhutan in late November this year. As background to my questions, I am a 62 yr. old woman, traveling with 3 friends of the same age range (but probably in better fitness condition :-)). I’m not overweight, but up till now wouldn’t be what you’d call fit (I get out of breath going up hills or after about 5 floors of steps) We are going through Asia Transpacific Journeys and they are arranging all of our guides. I have a bit of a fear of heights so I was pleased to see they have added railings on the stair sections up to the monastery. I am seriously considering riding a pony/horse to the 2nd stop to save some energy for the stair part. I have never ridden a horse so i am going to take a few lessons this summer to prepare, as I am worried I might fall off!! I am also training every day now on a stair stepper, an elliptical machine, 2 pilates classes per week, and taking some hikes outdoors. So, my three most important questions are:
    1. Can I request a short horse/pony, and one that will walk further away from the edge of the cliffs?
    2. On the 3rd section of the hike are there railings on the descent as well as the ascent up the stairs?
    3. I was planning on taking hiking poles for stability and support. Good idea or not?
    We will be in Bhutan for 7 days before the hike so I do hope the altitude won’t be a huge issue.
    I realize you are probably off on another adventure, but would so appreciate a response to these questions/concerns!

    • Zhiqiang & Tingyi
      September 10, 2012

      Hi Suzie

      Please see my replies below in bold:

      I LOVED your narrative and photos of the trek up to Tiger’s Nest Monastery. I am going to Myanmar and then Bhutan in late November this year. As background to my questions, I am a 62 yr. old woman, traveling with 3 friends of the same age range (but probably in better fitness condition :-)). I’m not overweight, but up till now wouldn’t be what you’d call fit (I get out of breath going up hills or after about 5 floors of steps) We are going through Asia Transpacific Journeys and they are arranging all of our guides. I have a bit of a fear of heights so I was pleased to see they have added railings on the stair sections up to the monastery.

      The railings are not very stable themselves (won’t fall off just slightly wobbly) and the path is very uneven. Just to manage your expectations.

      I am seriously considering riding a pony/horse to the 2nd stop to save some energy for the stair part. I have never ridden a horse so i am going to take a few lessons this summer to prepare, as I am worried I might fall off!!

      It is unlikely that you will fall off as it treads along quite slowly due to the steepness. just hold on tight.

      I am also training every day now on a stair stepper, an elliptical machine, 2 pilates classes per week, and taking some hikes outdoors. So, my three most important questions are:
      1. Can I request a short horse/pony, and one that will walk further away from the edge of the cliffs?

      They r ponies so are quite short. From what I have observed, these ponies will all walk along the edge of the cliffs as the terrain is flatter and even there (thanks to all the constant pony path up and down daily). While it seems dangerous, the journey is actually smoother here as compared to the inner path which is more rugged and uneven.

      2. On the 3rd section of the hike are there railings on the descent as well as the ascent up the stairs?

      Yes there are railings on the descent at your right and on your left, is the cliff face but the railings are quite wobbly and path uneven.

      3. I was planning on taking hiking poles for stability and support. Good idea or not?

      Definitely! especially for the route down which can be only be done on foot – no ponies allowed on descent.

      We will be in Bhutan for 7 days before the hike so I do hope the altitude won’t be a huge issue.
      I realize you are probably off on another adventure, but would so appreciate a response to these questions/concerns!

      Hope the above helps. Have fun and do share your experiences with us.

      • Suzie
        September 10, 2012

        Hi,
        Thank you for your responses, and yes, of course you may use my questions & your responses on your blog.
        One or two more questions. About the ponies: What exactly do you have available to hang onto? Is there a horn or something on the front of the saddle? Is the pony handler right there with you? While the railings are wobbly, can one balance themselves or hold them while going up & down the steps at all?
        Many thanks & I will definitely let you know how it goes for me when I return :-)!
        Best,
        Suzie Provo

      • Zhiqiang & Tingyi
        September 10, 2012

        Hi suzie

        You hold onto the ponies via something on the saddle. Depending on the size of the group, there is one pony handler per group so he will walk around to check everything is ok.

        You can balance yourselves with the railings going up and down the stairs.

  6. MARIA
    November 7, 2012

    Are there some monks living in the monastery? Hike Ride on the back of a magic flying tigeress, sorry what is a flying tigeress? Hike up will take like 4 hs.? and to descend? another 4? If someone have Acrophobia you don’t recomend? The monastery inside is great? What interesting things they have to offer for the visitor that take 4 long walking hours, you think it’s not at all a waist of time?

    • Zhiqiang & Tingyi
      November 8, 2012

      Yes – there r monks living in the monastery.

      Never mind about the flying tigress – that is a joke :-) it doesnt exist.

      Hike up and down will take about 4-5 hours in total (if you are fit). If you are not, suggest for you to take the pony up (ponies will not send you down so you still have to walk down)

      If you have fear of heights, I think it is ok since there are railings for you to support.

      I think the sight of the Tiger’s Nest monastery in itself together with the satisfaction that you had made the ascent could make the trip worthwhile. The inside of the monastery comprises the statues of the gods of Bhutan (similar to other monasteries around Bhutan).

  7. bran
    December 23, 2012

    Thank you for creating valuable post about the subject. I’m a fan of your site. Keep up the good work

  8. bran
    December 23, 2012

    good site, good work!!!

  9. Amita
    May 15, 2013

    I just came back from Bhutan, we have a group of 6. We stayed @ Taj Tashi@ Thimpu(deluxe),Uma@ Punakha(villa) n Uma Paro (deluxe), 1,2 n 3 notes respectively.
    Of all the 3, the first 2 exceeded our expectation, but Uma Paro was a disappointment. Service was not there, rooms were squeaky, and we were not being briefed abt what are the activities or places surrounding other than where is the library n the spa. When we enquired abt setting up bonfire for one of our dinners there, as it was in the morn, the service staff could not advise us n told us we need to speak to his supervisor who will only come to work in the afternoon!?? i read thru the info booklet in the room n was keen to join the yoga session only to be told that the instructor has just resigned, a week ago. And being a 5-star hotel n boasts abt the tranquility surrounding, n yoga is one of Uma’s main activity, why can’t they get another instructor? Somehow, i was told that their staff turnaround is high.
    When i was having breakfast, i asked for hot water, i was served with a pot n glass of hot water. Later, a more senior staff came to change my cup n apologize that the staff who gave me the hot water with a glass is new..he replaced the glass with a cup. Otherwise how to drink hot water from a glass?
    The best part is when i went to check out, and the counter staff asked me do i need to pay?
    I was like, hey, isn’t this my question instead of his?

    in the end, we talked to our guide n we had a bonfire at Metta resort hotel without any cost as our dinner is fixed there.
    I guess u got to stay in a villa hence there is a butler, n service is more personal.
    at times, when i walked out to the front desk @6am, as we need to leave for Tiger Nest @ 7am, no one was at the front desk! we came back around 10pm on the 2nd nite, we stayed 3 nites there, there was no one outside too, to open door for the guest. I can’t imagine this is the service of a 5-star hotel?
    we had superb service over at Taj Tashi n Uma Punakha.
    and for deluxe room, never never take the lobby floor room, always request the upper rooms, views are better n lesser noise..though u must prepare to walk a bit more…
    Frankly, the state of hotel, it looks run down, is not value for that value it commands..u can get better or ever villa stay if u opt for the next class of hotel in Paro.
    This is my advice.
    9TH MAY TO 15TH MAY 2013.

    • Zhiqiang & Tingyi
      May 16, 2013

      Hi Amita – thanks for sharing. so sorry to hear abt your experience – suggest that you feedback to Uma Paro about this experience and see what they can do for you or at least they can improve on the areas you pointed out.

  10. karma
    May 29, 2013

    hahaha!! looks more like mules. :) I am from Bhutan but live in the US. I finally got to go to Taktsang in 2011 for the first time and it was wonderful. Glad you guys had a good time!!!!

  11. chand
    March 31, 2015

    Hi!
    Could you tell me how long a reasonably fit 60 year old would take to walk up? and walk down? The rest of the group may take ponies..would not like to hold them up. Thank you and lovely reading about your very detailed account. Loved it.Chandini.

    • Zhiqiang & Tingyi
      March 31, 2015

      The key challenge for the journey up and down the mountain is the rocky, slippery and uneven paths – if you are fit and do quite a bit of exercise and walking regularly, you shld be able to manage the steepness but you just have to be very careful about loose rocks and slippery slope (it can get quite muddy if it had been raining). The ponies will trot uphill quite slowly too so you will not be too far away from the ponies.

      We had a friend who walked up while we took ponies (he wasn’t too far back throughout the journey (he will catch up within 5-6 minutes when our ponies stop to rest – he is quite fit and in his 40s and is a yoga instructor). There is a rest stop midway through the uphill journey so you will have more time to catch up.

      Do note that your group can only take ponies uphill and not downhill. All will have to walk downhill – which is not necessary easier because of uneven and rocky paths.

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